Measuring the Intellectual Capital of a University

Background
Intellectual capital has become a major driver for competitive advantage, not only for business but for universities and other service industries. Universities are major players in the knowledge producing and innovation systems. As knowledge producers, universities face the challenges of globalization, and the financial resources needed to maintain its competitive advantages.

In Indonesia, Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional (USBI) is a newly established university with perspectives. High competitive pressure from larger and older universities creates the need to seek competitive advantages. Intellectual capital of USBI can serve as one of them.

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Designing a Social Pedagogical Network Site

Introduction

Multimedia Production (MP) course is aimed to discuss and explore how new and emerging technologies can facilitate teaching both inside and outside the classroom. At the end of this course, students will built up the necessary conceptual and practical understanding and skills of the topics required to use, design and develop rich digital resources. One of the ways of delivering the course is by using the advancement of information and communication technology in the form of e-learning.

Online learning or e-learning is different from through reading manuals, watching videos, researching on the web or participating in instructor-led lecture. That means it should be designed differently to help ensure it is a successful part of a course.

This paper focuses particularly on the design process of MP course using best practices for developing e-learning courses composed by The Defense Centers of Excellence Training & Education Directorate (www.dcoe.health.mil).

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21st Century Learning: Application of Learning Theories for Student Engagement

Introduction

“The drop in student engagement for each year students are in school is our monumental, collective, national failure. There are several things that might help explain why this is happening – ranging from our overzealous focus on standardize testing and curricula to our lack of experiential and project-based learning pathway for students – not to mention the lack of pathway for students who will not and do not want to go on to college” (Busteed,2013).

Gallup Poll

Figure 1. The school cliff: Students engagement drops over time

Student engagement with school and learning is a gold standard that every parent, teacher and school strives to achieve. If we were doing right by our student and our future, the numbers would be the absolute opposite. For each year a student progresses in school, they should be more engaged, not less.

In this paper, I will share my observations from kindergarten to college to see the level of engagement in the classroom, discuss the term student engagement and its connection to constructivist learning theory, and explore what is needed toward a more active and engaging format to increase learning in the digital age. And, as a proposal, I will propose flipped classroom to get students more engaged in their learning.

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Evaluation of Open Learning Design Studio‚Äôs Massive Open Online Course (OLDS MOOC): Learning Design for a 21st Century Curriculum

Introduction

MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Course. MOOC is relatively new phenomenon as the first course carrying the name MOOC was offered in 2008. The term MOOC was coined by Dave Cormier and Bryan Alexander, when a course called “Connectivism and Connective Knowledge”, designed and led by George Siemens and Stephen Downes, attracted 25 fee-paying students on campus and 2,300 other students from general public who took the online class free of charge (Daniel, 2012). Even until today the definition of MOOC is keep evolving. The latest definition of MOOC is an online course aiming at large-scale participation and open access via the web. Typically MOOCs do not offer academic credit or charge tuition fees (Wikipedia, 2013).

MOOCs are divided into two branches, known as cMOOCs and xMOOCs. The two branches are so different, especially in aims and methods (Hill, 2012). Here we will focus particularly on the connectivist MOOCs or cMOOCs. McAuley, et al. (2010), defined cMOOCs by its characteristics as a MOOC integrates the connectivity of social networking, the facilitation of an acknowledged expert in a field of study, and a collection of freely online resources. Perhaps more importantly, however, a MOOC builds on the active engagement of several hundred to several thousand “students” who self-organize their participation according to learning goals, prior knowledge and skills, and common interests. One of the most recent cMOOC course is the “Learning Design for a 21st Century Curriculum” offered by Open Learning Design Studio or widely known as “OLDS MOOC”.

In this paper, I evaluate OLDS MOOC as an online course and investigate how it has incorporated the social pedagogical network theories i.e. connectivism, networked learning, and communities of practice. The evaluation was done by using Quality Online Course Initiative (QOCI) rubric and evaluation system developed by the Illinois Online Network (ION), University of Illinois.

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Reflections of HMLC5303: Learning Communities and Social Pedagogical Networks

What are learning communities?

The term learning community is used to describe every imaginable combination of individuals with an interest in education (DuFour, 2004).

DuFour (2004) argued that there are “big ideas” educators need to reflect critically on the concept of professional learning communities. I use these big ideas to understand the concept of learning communities by reflecting to my own experience as an educator.

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Connectivism, Networked Learning and Communities of Practice

Introduction

With the advancement of technology, previously prevalent learning theories of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism need to be updated. Since the advancement of the Internet as a significant medium of access to information and communication, the practice of networked learning has tended on its use. The Centre for Studies in Advanced Learning Technology (CSALT), a research group at Lancaster University, UK, is one of the promoters of Networked Learning as a new learning theory. In 2004, George Siemens introduces an alternative learning theory known as ‘Connectivism’. Further in 2005, Siemens expands his theory and its close relation to networked learning. The two theories are aligned with Etienne Wenger’s approach of knowing and learning in the form Communities of practice. In this paper, I will concentrate on connectivism, networked learning, and communities of practice definitions, similarities and differences.

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